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SELECT wp_posts.*, MATCH (wp_posts.post_title,wp_posts.post_content) AGAINST ('Buying a future coastal carnivores Douglas Neasloss, Kitasoo / Xai\'xais Nation Chief Counsel, thinks buying game holdings end trophy hunting Great Bear Rainforest a great idea.\"I think \'s beneficial many reasons,\" said Neasloss, also a community management director based small seaside town Klemtu Swindle Island, heart world-renowned conservation area. Shooting animals sport wasteful, disrespectful and contrary First Nations values, Neasloss said, noting trophy hunters often remove their skin and heads, but leave everything else behind.Get news highlights delivered your inbox.Our award-winning journalists bring you news &hellip;') as score FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.post_date <= '2022-01-16 09:40:36' ) AND wp_posts.ID NOT IN (610756) AND wp_posts.post_type IN ('post', 'page') AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp_posts.post_status = 'inherit')) AND MATCH (wp_posts.post_title,wp_posts.post_content) AGAINST ('Buying a future coastal carnivores Douglas Neasloss, Kitasoo / Xai\'xais Nation Chief Counsel, thinks buying game holdings end trophy hunting Great Bear Rainforest a great idea.\"I think \'s beneficial many reasons,\" said Neasloss, also a community management director based small seaside town Klemtu Swindle Island, heart world-renowned conservation area. Shooting animals sport wasteful, disrespectful and contrary First Nations values, Neasloss said, noting trophy hunters often remove their skin and heads, but leave everything else behind.Get news highlights delivered your inbox.Our award-winning journalists bring you news &hellip;') ORDER BY score DESC LIMIT 0, 6

Sunday, January 16

Buying a future for coastal carnivores

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SELECT wp_posts.*, MATCH (wp_posts.post_title,wp_posts.post_content) AGAINST ('Buying a future coastal carnivores Douglas Neasloss, Kitasoo / Xai\'xais Nation Chief Counsel, thinks buying game holdings end trophy hunting Great Bear Rainforest a great idea.\"I think \'s beneficial many reasons,\" said Neasloss, also a community management director based small seaside town Klemtu Swindle Island, heart world-renowned conservation area. Shooting animals sport wasteful, disrespectful and contrary First Nations values, Neasloss said, noting trophy hunters often remove their skin and heads, but leave everything else behind.Get news highlights delivered your inbox.Our award-winning journalists bring you news &hellip;') as score FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND ( wp_posts.post_date <= '2022-01-16 09:40:37' ) AND wp_posts.ID NOT IN (610756) AND wp_posts.post_type IN ('post', 'page') AND ((wp_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp_posts.post_status = 'inherit')) AND MATCH (wp_posts.post_title,wp_posts.post_content) AGAINST ('Buying a future coastal carnivores Douglas Neasloss, Kitasoo / Xai\'xais Nation Chief Counsel, thinks buying game holdings end trophy hunting Great Bear Rainforest a great idea.\"I think \'s beneficial many reasons,\" said Neasloss, also a community management director based small seaside town Klemtu Swindle Island, heart world-renowned conservation area. Shooting animals sport wasteful, disrespectful and contrary First Nations values, Neasloss said, noting trophy hunters often remove their skin and heads, but leave everything else behind.Get news highlights delivered your inbox.Our award-winning journalists bring you news &hellip;') ORDER BY score DESC LIMIT 0, 6

Douglas Neasloss, Kitasoo / Xai’xais Nation Chief Counsel, thinks buying game holdings to end trophy hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest is a great idea.

“I think it’s beneficial for many reasons,” said Neasloss, also a community management director based in the small seaside town of Klemtu on Swindle Island, in the heart of the world-renowned conservation area.

Shooting animals for sport is wasteful, disrespectful and contrary to First Nations values, Neasloss said, noting that trophy hunters often remove their skin and heads, but leave everything else behind.

“In our culture, we educate our youth to respect all wildlife, for all people,” Neasloss said.

“Our nation and many nations within the Great Bear Rainforest (GBR) have never been in favor of hunting for sport.

“It is a violation of our culture and it impacts our economy, and I believe that bears are worth more alive than dead.”

In 2017, the BC government brown bear trophy hunt ended in the province, and stopped all kinds of brown bear hunting in the GBR – an area equivalent in size to Ireland on the isolated central and northern coasts of the province.

A conservation group hopes to buy commercial hunting rights to save black bears, wolves and other prized prey from trophy hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest. Photo by Florent Nicolas

But in an effort to protect other coastal carnivores like black bears, wolves, cougars, and other prey prized by sport hunters like mountain goats, the Raincoast Conservation Foundation aims to buy the commercial hunting license, or tenure, which covers 18,239 square kilometers, a quarter of the GBR that includes most of its southern flank.

The foundation has already acquired hunting rights to more than 38,000 square kilometers of British Columbia’s coastline, an area larger than Vancouver Island, said Brian Falconer, who is raising funds and negotiating the Raincoast acquisitions.

“It’s a violation of our culture and it impacts our economy, and I think bears are worth more alive than dead,” says Kitasoo / Xai’xais Nation Chief Douglas Neasloss of trophy hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest.

Hunting tenures give guide providers the right to take people who are not residents of the province on shooting forays. Maintaining tenure does not prevent provincial hunters from hunting for food, Falconer said, adding that procurement from supply providers is voluntary and respectfully negotiated.

This will be the sixth time the foundation has proposed to purchase commercial hunting rights in GBR and the newer area is home to significant populations of grizzly bears, cougars and wolves that roam the shores of six major coastal inlets and more than 10 major river systems in an area stretching from Smith Inlet in the north to Toba Inlet in the south.

The Raincoast Conservation Foundation is raising $ 1.92 million to purchase the commercial trophy hunting license that covers more than a quarter of the Great Bear Rainforest to protect Roosevelt bears, wolves, cougars and elk. Image courtesy of Raincoast

It also provides habitat for the Roosevelt elk, extinct elsewhere in the province, and encompasses more than 19 ecotourism ventures, many of them run by indigenous people, who depend on wildlife viewing, he added.

Buying game holdings at a fair price is a good example of a just transition in an extractive resources industry, similar to those sought in the ancient logging or fossil fuel sectors, Falconer said.

“There is simply no economic, ethical or ecological reason to remove carnivores from an ecosystem,” he said, adding that trophy hunting is archaic and not supported by the majority of British Columbia residents.

Local income and jobs from ecotourism and the preservation of predators and charismatic species far exceed those from trophy hunting, he said.

Trophy hunters often target the biggest, oldest and best examples of a species, resulting in a weaker gene pool, Falconer said.

Humans are actually “Super predators”– the only hunters who put undue pressure on large populations of carnivores, Falconer said.

Neasloss agreed that trophy hunting jeopardizes ecotourism and the sustainable economic development on which his community depends.

The Kitasoo / Xai’xais Nation invested a lot of time and money in a successful wildlife viewing complex dependent on tourists traveling to wild settings to marvel at grizzly bears, black bears, and the famous cream-colored spirit bear.

Ecotourism provides the small community with 40 jobs employing a variety of people and $ 2.5 million a year for the community, he said.

“We wanted to develop something that is sustainable in the long term,” Neasloss said, adding that there was a lot of resistance from the hunting industry to the ban on trophy hunting brown bears.

“I think people were concerned that the loss of bears was the start of something bigger and that they would lose all the animals,” Neasloss said, noting that it was an impetus to stop hunting for sport, not livelihood.

“For me, trophy hunting is something that did not belong in this part of the world,” he said. “Not in this new era.”

Rochelle Baker / Local Journalism Initiative / Canada National Observer

Reference-www.nationalobserver.com

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