Friday, October 30

Röttgen’s visit to the heute show shows that top politicians have no business there


What does Norbert Röttgen do in a comedy show? Oliver Welke probably gave the answer himself. “Armin Laschet stands for the continuity of Angela Merkel’s policy. Friedrich Merz stands for the break. You, Mr. Röttgen, stand for that certain nothing! ”Laschet, Merz and Röttgen are vying for the party chairmanship of the CDU. There is an election in December. So it can’t hurt that the 55-year-old foreign expert for the Union quickly gains a little profile. Röttgen says he doesn’t want to automatically become chancellor. He only wanted the office of chairman of his party because the CDU was “in need of renewal”. He also smiles nicely. Was that the first joke now?

Loud to heated

The “heute show” has its own temperature. It’s sometimes loud, sometimes cheeky, sometimes heated. Birte Schneider (Christine Prayon) stands in front of the Berlin Chancellery with an automobile that says “No Fun Mobil” and grumbles against young people who “just want to party, drink and rub each other” and then “come home pregnant and grandma with them Infect Corona “. Gernot Hassknecht (Hans-Joachim Heist) complains loudly about the electoral reform, which reduces the current 705 parliamentarians in the Bundestag by three overhang seats. He screams and screams and screams.

The wrong format

And now there is Norbert Röttgen in his neat suit, speaks moderately and looks exactly like the politicians who had been comedically beaten a few seconds earlier. “It’s not about personnel issues,” emphasizes Röttgen. “Difficult times are ahead of us.” He mentions the slow digitization that is downright “scandalous”. Röttgen obviously wants to score points with the young people. But it just doesn’t fit into the format. Perhaps that is why Welke positioned the conversation at the end of the show so that he doesn’t lose a lot of viewers at halfway through the show.

Beer, sausage and Röttgen

Norbert Röttgen is not the first politician to be drawn to wither. Claudia Roth, Wolfgang Bosbach, Hannelore Kraft, Peter Altmaier, Jens Spahn, Wolfgang Kubicki, Gregor Gysi and Robert Habeck were already there. But Röttgen is probably one of those who doesn’t have enough fun for that. He has a standing leg, but no free leg. This becomes clear when Welke assumes he is pretended to be close to the people and presents a photo that shows him with beer and sausage. The picture looks tense and staged. Instead of countering funny, Röttgen explains the snapshot in detail. “That was after an event. That is an original Thuringian sausage and a beer. Both tasted great! ”This is the answer to the joke and if Röttgen could really say something substantial, he’ll pinch.

Question marks remain

“Who will be the CDU general secretary?” Welke wants to know. “I already have one, but I’m not going to say who it is.” “Then you have to assume that you don’t have one,” says Welke. “You are a blackmailer!” Röttgen counters and adds: “She is a woman who has political experience.” Political experience? Well hopefully! Then Röttgen reports that ARD offered him and his two opponents Laschet and Merz a TV duel, but his opponents had pinched. Apparently the competition had the sure feeling that Röttgen would be anything but funny.

Conclusion: Maybe Oliver Welke should stop inviting top politicians to his show. You simply have no business being there. The “Today Show” serves biting ridicule, nasty criticism, yes, and also a certain one-sidedness, because dialectics are just not funny. Studio guests from politics are better off at Will, Plasberg, and even Lanz.

More exciting news on FOCUS Online

Armin Laschet, Friedrich Merz and Norbert Röttgen appeared in front of the Junge Union this Saturday to apply for the CDU chairmanship. But who did the best?

Strange change in character at Olaf Scholz: A moment ago the finance minister stood for strict budget discipline, now he spends the money as if there was no tomorrow. Worried question: Was Scholz secretly exchanged? The FOCUS column by Jan Fleischhauer.


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