Wednesday letters: time for Canada to raise the flag again

Article content

I know that I am not the only one who emphasizes the division that is evident in many aspects of our daily lives. Social gaps are being driven in accordance with responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change mitigation policies, Truth and Reconciliation recommendations, and the growing social economic gap. The social divide in Canada is far from limited to these issues.

Commercial

Article content

In the face of attacks on Canadian historical figures and historic political elections, I began to read Canadian history to better understand. I have come to a better understanding that John A. Macdonald was flawed, but he was a nation builder with a vision of a Canada that stretched from east to west. He strove to create a strong federal government that would resist assimilation by the United States. I value this vision.

I am very concerned that the federal government under liberal leadership has chosen to attack the symbol that represents Canada internally and internationally. Everyone who lives in Canada is Canadian. We unite as one with the Canadian flag. Don’t use this symbol to divide us.

Commercial

Article content

Address Truth and Reconciliation recommendations with tax dollars and political intentions. Regularly inform all Canadians of your progress. We are all attentive to the appropriate resolutions. Use the Canadian flag to underline our unity. Raise the flag.

Heather Steinke, Sherwood Park

Make traffic light changes consistent for safety

As you approach an intersection, you will see a countdown sign that says “3, 2, 1”. So slow down thinking that the traffic lights will change soon. Sure enough, when the countdown stops, the traffic light turns amber and then red. It’s great when it works. Constant traffic information allows us to make safe driving decisions. Except this is not what always happens on the streets of Edmonton.

Commercial

Article content

Sometimes the signal says 3, 2, 1 (you’re slowing down, waiting for the account to stop and an amber light to come on) and nothing happens. That semitrailer behind you almost hit you from behind because you slowed down expecting the light to change, but it didn’t.
Even more confusing, some traffic light countdown signs say “3, 2, 1, amber” on one day and don’t act the same on another day.

I’m sure the City of Edmonton traffic engineers have a reason to implement this signal behavior. If so, can you explain it to Edmonton drivers? Current signal programming violates human usability expectations: it is not intuitive and it is very dangerous.

Please send us countdown signals that constantly go “3, 2, 1, amber” or none at all.

Commercial

Article content

John Baker, Edmonton

Voters rejected intermediate options

The results of Monday’s election sent a clear message: Given a choice between PCU-style conservatism and progressivism, Edmonton voters will overwhelmingly choose progressivism. The 2023 elections are shaping up to be a similar battle between the ideological conservatism of the UCP and the strident progressivism of the Alberta NDP.

The average pragmatism of the Alberta CPs, which made this province what it is today, is absent. Progressive and conservative candidates for mayor of Edmonton, Kim Krushell and Michael Oshry, got a modest 17 and 6 percent of the vote, respectively.

In electing Sohi, Edmonton voters chose years of more property tax increases, massive and unaffordable investments in an increasingly underused and unsafe transit system, and inaction in the face of rampant crime and disorder that is destroying our city ​​center. In doing so, voters may have sent Kenney a message, but it was not the correct one. Rather than signal a willingness to vote for progressive conservative candidates who promise pragmatic action on the biggest challenges facing the city, Edmonton chose to show that it is becoming a lost cause for any form of conservatism.

Even if the UCP shifts toward the pragmatic and moderate conservatism of Alberta’s PCs, Edmonton will likely continue to elect higher taxes and bigger government. Why even bother?

TG Sangster, Edmonton

Welcome letters

We invite you to write letters to the editor. A maximum of 150 words is preferred. The letters must have a first and last name, or two initials and a last name, and include an address and a telephone number during the day. All letters are subject to editing. We do not publish letters addressed to third parties or sent to other publications. Email: [email protected]

    Commercial

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civilized discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to moderate before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications – you will now receive an email if you receive a response to your comment, there is an update from a comment thread you follow, or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Principles for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

Reference-edmontonjournal.com

Leave a Comment