War in Ukraine, day 714 | Ukraine asks for more help from the West after “massive” attack

(Kyiv) Ukraine on Wednesday called on the West to send it the weapons and ammunition it sorely needs after a new “massive” air attack by Russia, which killed at least five people.




These Russian strikes notably targeted Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital, where debris from a downed missile fell on a residential building, killing four people and injuring forty.

The head of Ukrainian diplomacy, Dmytro Kouleba, took the opportunity to confront Kyiv’s allies with their promises. He regretted a “confused” situation in the United States, where Congress has been unable for months, against a backdrop of electoral struggle before the presidential election in November, to vote on a new package.

Mr. Kouleba also urged the European Union to “increase” its deliveries of artillery shells, which Ukrainian troops lack on the front. In particular, he asked the Twenty-Seven to “sign long-term contracts with Ukrainian defense companies”, to “reorient existing contracts for the delivery of shells to Ukraine” and to “increase imports of ammunition from third countries”.

Wednesday’s Russian strikes also took place during a visit by the head of European diplomacy Josep Borrell, who, like many Western officials before him during the two years of war, had to take refuge in an air raid shelter, observed an AFP journalist.

PHOTO SERGEI SUPINSKY, AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Kyiv, February 7, 2024

Mr Borrell called on Europeans to help Ukraine “whatever it costs”. EU leaders agreed last Thursday in Brussels to provide additional aid of 50 billion euros over four years.

64 devices pulled

According to President Volodymyr Zelensky, six regions of Ukraine were targeted by the Russian attack on Wednesday, the first of this scale since the end of January with missiles and drones launched in several waves.

In the capital, the alert was triggered shortly before 6 a.m. local time, and lasted three hours. Several series of loud explosions resonated in the city, according to AFP journalists on site.

PHOTO SERGEI SUPINSKY, AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Kyiv, February 7, 2024

In total, Russia launched 44 missiles and 20 explosive drones at Ukraine, Commander-in-Chief of the Ukrainian Armies Valery Zaluzhny said on Telegram. According to him, these include 36 cruise projectiles of various types, three ballistic missiles and 5 S-300 missiles.

Of this total of 64 devices, Ukrainian forces intercepted 29 cruise missiles and 15 drones, added the same source.

As usual, the Russian Defense Ministry claimed to have only targeted military targets and that they had “all been destroyed”.

In Kyiv, debris from a downed missile fell on a 17-story residential building in the Golosiivsky district.

A fire truck used a large crane to put out the fire with jets of water and firefighters also entered the building late in the morning, noted an AFP journalist.

Windows blown out

On several upper floors, smoke was billowing from the windows and the walls were blackened.

“I even saw the missile flying, it rose and then flew with its tail on fire, I couldn’t see where, then it hit,” said resident Valentyna Kozatchouk, a 63-year-old retiree. years.

According to her, all the doors leading to the landing and the stairwell were blown out and the windows on her balcony were damaged.

Another resident, Dmytro, was afraid for his wife, who was on a balcony during the attack.

Having gone out to shelter his children, he wanted to come back and get his partner. But the rescuers “didn’t let me in,” he explained.

“She might be dead,” he worried.

Kharkiv, the country’s second city located in the east, came under fire from S-300 missiles, said regional governor Oleg Synegoubov.

In the Lviv region (west), a missile hit an industrial site in the town of Drogobych, around fifty kilometers from the Polish border, without causing any casualties, regional governor Maksym Kozytsky said on Telegram. However, another missile was able to be shot down in this region, according to the same source.


reference: www.lapresse.ca

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