War between Israel and Hamas | Famine is imminent or even already underway

Famine “is imminent”, if it has not already set in in Gaza, where the situation is already more catastrophic than in Sudan, Somalia and Afghanistan, according to the United Nations. At least 1.1 million people are currently “at the highest stage of hunger”.




According to a new assessment of the Integrated Food Security Classification Framework published on Monday, the risk of famine in Gaza is particularly high in the north, where thousands of Gazans have remained or returned, many of whom live under rubble.

For famine to be declared, three (quantified) criteria must be met: an extreme lack of food and acute malnutrition among children – two elements that are largely outdated, according to the United Nations Agriculture and Agriculture Organization. food (FAO) – as well as certain mortality thresholds.

  • Members of a family eat in front of the rubble of their house in Rafah.

    PHOTO FATIMA SHBAIR, ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Members of a family eat in front of the rubble of their house in Rafah.

  • A Palestinian buried under the rubble of a missile strike in Gaza City is close to being rescued.

    PHOTO AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

    A Palestinian buried under the rubble of a missile strike in Gaza City is close to being rescued.

  • Families flee an area bombed by Israel in Gaza City.

    PHOTO AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

    Families flee an area bombed by Israel in Gaza City.

  • Palestinian women queue for food at a refugee camp in Jabalia.

    PHOTO MAHMOUD ESSA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Palestinian women queue for food at a refugee camp in Jabalia.

  • The southern Gaza Strip photographed from Israeli territory

    PHOTO OHAD ZWIGENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS

    The southern Gaza Strip photographed from Israeli territory

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We are therefore at a disastrous reckoning which consists of determining whether there is technically famine or not. “We are in bureaucratic semantics,” confirms François Audet, director of the Canadian Observatory on Crises and Humanitarian Action and professor at UQAM.

It is a question here, he continues, of “justifying the use of a term which has a humanitarian and political significance, especially since this famine is not created by a natural disaster, but by man, by Israel “.

The risk of being “on the wrong side of History”

No drought, no flood here. And Israel’s justification that its just security is at stake and that the goal is to dismantle Hamas no longer holds, in his opinion. “The desire, in my eyes, is to make the civilian population of Gaza suffer” in a spirit of revenge, believes Mr. Audet.

In the Washington Post On Monday, Moamen al-Harhani, a 29-year-old man from the northern Gaza town of Jabalia, explained that “there is no rice, no sugar, no beans, no lentils …No fruits or vegetables. People eat the food of animals and livestock,” a bread substitute being made from animal food.

“The strong eat. The weak die,” summarized Ahmed Najjar, also from Jabalia, in the same report.

In the French daily The world, Beth Bechdol, Deputy Director General of the FAO, explained that the humanitarian crisis observed in Gaza is unprecedented in its scale and speed.

For all political bodies around the world, including municipal entities, those who remain silent risk “finding themselves on the wrong side of History”, believes François Audet.

“Silence is also a position taken,” observes François Audet.

Canada “full of contradictions”

Is Canada doing enough in the face of tragedy? Mélanie Joly, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, have certainly criticized Israel more openly in recent months, “but Canada’s reaction time was long and full of contradictions,” judges Mr. Audet.

Because Ottawa cannot both stand alongside Israel and regret in the same breath that civilians are suffering to this extent. This posture, which is also that of other governments, is as paradoxical as it is contradictory, according to Mr. Audet.

Thomas Juneau, professor of international affairs at the University of Ottawa, notes that the tragedy of this famine in Gaza comes in particular from the fact that it “was entirely predictable”.

But what is just as dramatic is that even if a ceasefire were finally reached, “Gaza’s infrastructure – the roads, the hospitals, the sewers, the schools – are in such a state that the situation “will continue to get worse” even after a truce.

We are at anarchy, recalls Mr. Juneau. Hamas was responsible for security and there are no longer any police services.

Faced with such chaos, he recalls, neither Canada nor the Arab countries are willing to send troops who would become targets. “The Arab leaders have said that there is no question of them going to repair the mess” by Israel.

Mr. Juneau adds in the same breath, however, that in discussions surrounding a ceasefire, “we must ask both sides” to get their way. “Israel must stop its apocalyptic destruction of Gaza, but Hamas must release the hostages. »

The fact that the very urgent release of the hostages is not associated with the truce is rightly a source of frustration for Israel, concludes Mr. Juneau.

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  • 1.1 million
    Number of Gazans facing “a situation of catastrophic hunger”

    source: United Nations


reference: www.lapresse.ca

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