Tuesday’s Letters: Staples Minimizes Risks Posed by Unvaxxed

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Re. “Vaxxed and novaxxed have responsibilities for each other,” David Staples, October 15

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It is false and irresponsible for David Staples to suggest that those who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 do not pose a “real threat” to the rest of the United States.

The unvaccinated by choice have overwhelmed our healthcare system and are depleting healthcare workers. They have prevented people with other health problems from getting the care they need. They have a greater capacity to spread COVID so we have high levels of the disease circulating in our communities; This puts children and others who cannot be vaccinated at greater risk and increases the chance that we will end up with more variants, some of which may not respond to the vaccines we have.

Staples should know that his suggestion is false because he argues later in the column that “… all confinement restrictions will disappear only when our ICUs are no longer threatened…. That will only happen if we avoid another big wave of Albertans without gaps… ”.

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Misinformation is fueling doubts about vaccines. Staples and the Journal should retract their false claim and provide accurate information on why COVID requires a community response. Being vaccinated is not an impenetrable shield; some vaccinated people still die. We need a high level of vaccination plus other public health measures to effectively reign in COVID.

Jennifer Warren, Edmonton

Maintain Ring Houses on the U of A campus

Regarding the Journal article earlier this month “Four Historic U of A Ring Houses Saved from Demolition”, I want to challenge the idea that the University of Alberta Ring Houses have been “saved.” These houses are some of the most important historic structures on the University of Alberta campus.

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But its importance is not only the buildings themselves, but the sense of place they create in the place where they are. The distinctive feeling evoked by the houses where they are, their relationship to nearby buildings and the old trees that surround them, their location in the university community – this sense of place is lost forever if buildings are moved. This is especially the case because of their relationship to the history of the U of A, as former homes of presidents and teachers. It’s a shame that the university has ignored the petition signed by more than 2,600 community members calling for a one-year moratorium on demolition, to consider other options.

One hopes that a way can be found to keep them on campus.

CJ Thompson, Edmonton

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Reference-edmontonjournal.com

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