Canada is holding its 44th federal election and there is a lot to talk about.

The fourth wave of a global pandemic that crushed the national economy is increasing among the unvaccinated. Leading scientists have declared to the world that urgent action on climate change now can only determine how much worse it gets. Rising housing costs in the country’s largest province have highlighted affordability issues. And Canada has once again been called to bear in mind the horrors of its colonial reality, a reality that includes untold numbers of indigenous children buried in nameless graves.

The Star believes that all of this is important enough to define the campaign that will end on Election Day on September 20. That’s why our reporters have written primers for the issues we think will play a big role in this election: climate change, affordability. , recovery from the pandemic and racial justice and reconciliation.

On climate change, Alex Ballingall reports how the debate has shifted from a fight over the carbon tax, creating space, perhaps, to focus on Canada’s rising emissions from fossil fuel extraction.

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On affordability, Stephanie Levitz reports how the high cost and shortage of housing and child care has become a focus of attention throughout the pandemic, and how each party will offer something to address these issues.

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On recovering from the pandemic, Alex Boutilier reports how different parties offer competing insights on how to deal with the aftermath of COVID-19.

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On racial justice and reconciliation, Jacques Gallant reports how the discovery of unmarked graves at a residential school in Kamloops could spark a focus on anti-racism, inclusion and reconciliation through the campaign.

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