The labor market is more favorable to employees than to employers



Others like Yvonnick Le Lorec are full of hope. He is currently working on the final preparations for his new restaurant on Sherbrooke Street in Winnipeg, which he plans to open for the summer.

The search for staff was a lot of work, he admits.

We were lucky, we put ads on Indeed. We were lucky to have contacts too. Our young people from last week also came back to work with us [sur le pont Provencher]. We are also opening in Sherbrook in a few weeks. Staff had to be found. We even made an announcement on the network of pvtists in France. [ndlr : forum de travailleurs en permis vacances-travail]we did not have too many returnshe explains.

Despite everything, he managed to find the profiles he was looking for and the question of retention is not far off.

For positions of responsibility, they are not at least [salaire]. We said we would make a point after the summer with the opening of the restaurant. If we have good progress […] there will definitely be an upgrade [des salaires]he assures.

How to find workers?

For many restaurant entrepreneurs, the challenge of attracting employees is great. That said, the trend is generalized.

The sectors that are currently in great need are obviously the field of catering, hotels, retail, small businesses and also the field of health.notes Joel Lemoine, Director of Business Support for the Economic Development Council for Bilingual Municipalities of Manitoba.

The professor of economics at the University of Saint-Boniface Faiçal Zellama sees only one solution: to increase wages.

The wage increase, it will allow companies to retain the workforce. The company, the restaurant will earn on the cost of recruitment. If your salary is low, you’re not going to retain, so people are going to leave. Every time you will spend time and money to recruit your staffhe says.

According to Zellama, the focus should also be on young people for restaurant jobs this summer, as long as they are given some perspective.

He notices that many of his students would rather work in call centers than in restaurants as waiters.

Call centers offer training. A large part of my students, because they are bilingual, are better paid. »

A quote from Faiçal Zellama, professor of economics at the University of Saint-Boniface

The director of business support for the Economic Development Council of Manitoba Bilingual Municipalities (CDEM) Joel Lemoine also points to a smaller pool of candidates.

One of the big challenges is that because of the pandemic, there have not been many newcomers to increase the number of employees available to work in certain areas.he recalls.

He adds that part-time summer jobs aren’t always very attractive either.

Entrepreneurs already in difficulty

Raising wages does not seem like a miracle solution for everyone, especially in a context of high inflation.

I’m not saying that’s a bad solution, but if that’s everyone’s answer, the inflation situation will continue.says the president of the Saint-Boniface Chamber of Commerce, Philippe Richer.

Joel Lemoine also fears that the rise in wages will be reflected in the price of plates.

However, he asserts that the CDEM has a good database of potential candidates for employers.

Local people or newcomers looking for work. We have people working there. It’s just a matter of finding the area of ​​expertise to make the right combinationhe said.

“It gives at least some level of encouragement. There may not be the number they are looking for, but we certainly have people we are able to place”, assures Joel Lemoine.

Yvonnick Le Lorec is about to open his creperie in downtown WInnipeg this summer.

Photo: Radio-Canada

Yvonnick Le Lorec is looking for bilingual staff, which is far from simple. Although he strives to train his workers internally and tries to establish a friendly working atmosphere, he feels that the catering professions are not the most valued.

In the meantime, he tightens his belt.

Since we started the business, my partner and I haven’t paid each other a salary. We take some dividends to livehe says.

The company is three years old, we are still developing. Every year we invest a lot and this year it’s a big investment with the restaurant on Sherbrook Street. We hope to be able to have a salary, but in the meantime we create wealth and create jobshe points out.

With information from Alexia Bille



Reference-ici.radio-canada.ca

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