Outrage over North American pipelines slows Glasgow streets

Protesters briefly disrupted traffic outside the main gates of the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland, on Monday to highlight the refusal of Canada and the United States to block new oil and gas projects.

Some 30 protesters organized by the US environmental group Build Back Fossil Free gathered in front of the tall metal fences that protect the entrance to the Scottish Events Center, where the leaders of both countries then highlighted their climate policies. Among the group were representatives of those hardest hit by major fossil fuel projects and infrastructure, including the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline and Alberta’s oil sands.

Complex travel requirements, high accommodation and travel costs, and strict capacity limits related to COVID-19 at the main conference venue have also raised concerns about conference accessibility for representatives of low-income communities. income most affected by climate change.

Police officers ask protesters to move away from the main entrance of the COP26 meeting in Glasgow. Photo by Marc Fawcett-Atkinson / National Observer of Canada.

“We are here as the original people of the United States to denounce the polluters conference,” said Tom Goldtooth, executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network. “It is not a climate conference, it has been taken over by corporate interests.”

For Goldtooth, Biden’s decisions to continue investing in fossil fuels despite having pledged to take a firm stance to end the climate crisis amount to “broken promises.”

The climate conference, also known as COP, short for Conference of the Parties, brings the world together to negotiate agreements to reduce global warming. The talks bring together legislators, scientists, environmental activists, climate experts and the media from the 197 member countries of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and US President Joe Biden spoke at the two-day leaders’ summit on Monday. Both leaders highlighted their governments’ efforts to address the climate crisis.

People from the communities most affected by climate change and pollution related to the oil and gas and petrochemical industries took the stage to denounce the inaction of world leaders who spoke later on Monday in the main conference venue. . Photo by Marc Fawcett-Atkinson / National Observer of Canada.

According to a report released by the United Nations Environment Program ahead of the conference, all countries’ pledges to cut emissions fall far short of the cuts needed to keep global temperatures in a safe range. Globally, current government plans would lead to the extraction of approximately 57% more oil and 71% more gas than is necessary to keep global warming within the 1.5 C limit agreed in the Paris Agreement of 2015.

The promises of Canada and the United States also fall short.

“We are here as the original people of the United States to denounce the polluters conference,” said Tom Goldtooth, executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network. “It is not a climate conference, it has been taken over by corporate interests.”

Goldtooth and other speakers said his pledges do little to address decades of environmental injustices related to the production of fossil fuels and the manufacture of petrochemicals. Indigenous and other marginalized communities tend to be disproportionately affected by environmental damage.

Most of the protesters were young, a reflection of the relatively youthful atmosphere within the main conference venue. Photo by Marc Fawcett-Atkinson / National Observer of Canada.

Reference-www.nationalobserver.com

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