NASA's moon capsule heads home, overflies history

SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY: MUST CREDIT NASA++MUSIC CLEARED FOR USAGE++++ON-SCREEN GRAPHICS AT SOURCE++++COMMENTARY AT SOURCE++NASA – MUST CREDIT NASASpace – 5 December 20221. Various views of the moon and capsule from NASA’s Orion capsuleANNOTATION: NASA’s Orion capsule is on its way home from the moon to wrap up a three-week test flight. ANNOTATION: The capsule and its test dummies came within 80 miles of the far side of the moon Monday. ANNOTATION: Once emerging from behind the moon, Orion flew over a couple Apollo landing sites. NASA – MUST CREDIT NASAHouston – 5 December 20222. View inside NASA’s Mission Control CenterANNOTATION: The capsule was too high to make out the Apollo lander descent stages or anything else left behind by astronauts more than a half-century ago. NASA – MUST CREDIT NASASpace – 5 December 20223. View of lunar surface and Earth as capsule returnsANNOTATION: Orion will aim for a Pacific splashdown Sunday off of San Diego, setting the stage for astronauts on the next moonshot.STORYLINE:NASA’s Orion capsule and its test dummies swooped one last time around the moon Monday, flying over a couple Apollo landing sites before heading home. Orion will aim for a Pacific splashdown Sunday off San Diego, setting the stage for astronauts on the next flight in a couple years.The capsule passed within 80 miles (130 kilometers) of the far side of the moon, using the lunar gravity as a slingshot for the 237,000-mile (380,000-kilometer) ride back to Earth. It spent a week in a wide, sweeping lunar orbit.Once emerging from behind the moon and regaining communication with flight controllers in Houston, Orion beamed back photos of a close-up moon and a crescent Earth _ Earthrise _ in the distance. “Orion now has its sights set on home,” said Mission Control commentator Sandra Jones.The capsule also passed over the landing sites of Apollo 12 and 14. But at 6,000 miles (9,600 kilometers) up, it was too high to make out the descent stages of the lunar landers or anything else left behind by astronauts more than a half-century ago. During a similar flyover two weeks ago, it was too dark for pictures. This time, it was daylight.Orion will aim for a Pacific splashdown Sunday off of San Diego, setting the stage for astronauts on the next moonshot.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: [email protected](ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.

reference: www.msn.com

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