‘It’s only getting worse’, Okanagan Veterinary Hospital struggles with staff shortages | The Canadian News

The rising omikron wave has led to staff shortages at veterinary hospitals in the Okanagan with many struggling to keep up with demand.

Fairfield Animal Hospital is the largest and only 24-hour animal hospital in the Okanagan. Dr. Jennifer Watt is the MD at Fairfield.

“It’s getting to the point where we’re trying to attract doctors and support staff from other clinics to help us keep the doors open 24 hours a day.”

Read more:

Kelowna General Hospital closes two operating theaters as staff shortages increase

Pet owners need to be willing to experience longer waiting times, but that the hospital does the best they can, she said.

Story continues below ad

“Our doors are always open. We do work on a triage system, so sometimes there is a bit of a wait. If you have to wait, it’s good, because it means your pet is not as sick as others. ”


Click to play video: 'Will BC health care workers be relocated to other regions in the province to make up for staff shortages?'



Will BC health care workers be relocated to other regions in the province to make up for staff shortages?


Will BC health care workers be relocated to other regions in the province to make up for staff shortages? – 1 Nov 2021

Other clinics in the Okanagan do not have the capacity to move in staff to cover the shortages.

Read more:

Omicron is expected to increase ‘absence’ from the workplace in January as cases increase

Dr. Moshe Oz at Rose Valley Veterinary Hospital says they have also been largely affected by staff shortages due to COVID.

“We probably had a good 25 percent of our staff week after week from the end of December to the beginning of January.”

Story continues below ad

Getting staff from other clinics is not an option, Oz said.

“Unfortunately, we do not have additional hospitals from which to draw our staff and doctors, so it really only comes down to the staff we have in the clinic and people moving into different roles.”

Read more:

Staff shortages temporarily close Merritt Hospital’s emergency department

The mental well-being of doctors and staff working in the front lines is tense.


Click to play video: 'CMHA sees strong increase in calls amid Omicron'



CMHA sees a sharp increase in calls amid Omicron


CMHA sees a sharp increase in calls amid Omicron – 14 January 2022

“The other thing we are dealing with is stress leave. Many of our doctors find it really difficult to work these shifts and have a life, ”explains dr. Watt.

“We always try to balance by saying yes [to clients while managing] staff well-being and does not cause burnout ”, says dr. Oz.

Story continues below ad

The crux of the matter for pet owners is to be patient.

Dr. Watt said: “Staff try their best if [they] able to save lives and keep animals healthy. ”



Reference-globalnews.ca

Leave a Comment