After a year of the smartphone brand Honor was sold by the Chinese giant Huawei to a consortium of more than 30 agents and consumers, the new company presented the Honor 50, its first smartphone manufactured independently and that has the set of Google applications that are usually preloaded on the devices with operating system Android O Google Mobile Services.

The new smartphone, which in Mexico has a sale price ranging from 12,999 to 15,999 pesos, is a device aimed at a group of consumers ranging from 21 to 34 years of age, with a particular interest in the generation of photo and video content.

It has a processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 778G with 5G; 6.57-inch curved screen, and a 32-megapixel front camera and 108-megapixel rear camera.

In May 2019, the United States government, whose head at that time was Donald Trump, included the Chinese technology company Huawei to a list of companies considered a threat to the national security of that country. To date and despite a few months of truce, the company has not been able to get rid of this veto that prevents it from using the technological developments of US companies such as Google and selling their products in the United States. In contrast, the Joe Biden administration enacted a new law that prevents companies like Huawei and ZTE from receiving new licenses from US regulators.

With your new team, Honor crosses the veto and moves away from its former owner Huawei, to get closer to other American technology companies such as Google, Qualcomm, Intel and Microsoft. For Julio Meneses, Honorary Marketing Director in Mexico, the separation of the Huawei brand has meant that the company’s structure has grown, reaching a total of 100 employees in eight countries in the Latin American region, including Mexico. .

Trending on Canadian News  Parry Sound-Muskoka MP Scott Aitchison enters federal leadership race

“The Honor 50 it represents very well the whole transition that we are making in terms of design and technology. Today we have been independent for the establishment of Honor in Mexico for 10 months. We have been doing this process of establishing our own processes, ”Meneses said in an interview.

The director of this company, whose operations center is kept in the same city as its former owner, Shenzhen, in China, admitted the US veto of Huawei was a major challenge for Honor and his team, so immediately after their separation, they observed that it was necessary to integrate to the platform that would allow them to access the applications to which users are accustomed: Google.

“In Mexico, Google Mobile Services it is the main core of use that exists and hence we could not not be part of it. There was work for many months with Google to establish the platform in the most appropriate way. This is already working in Mexico and Europe and our alliances are not only limited to Google but to other companies such as Qualcomm, Intel and Microsoft”Meneses said.

In addition to alliances with technology companies in the United States, its separation from Huawei represents a change in the type of user its products are aimed at: a young consumer, with a need for a team with a more daring design in terms of design and colors, and technology and performance also geared towards a younger audience, a broader segment, which includes older people, ranging from 35 to 45 years of age.

Trending on Canadian News  How Milner underlines Liverpool strength in depth

The expectation of Honor In the future, according to Julio Meneses, it is to strengthen its product portfolio so that it appeals to any consumer without considering their immediate needs, both in terms of price and performance. Although this possibility might fade, according to a American newspaper report The Washington Post which states that different regulatory agencies in the United States are debating whether Honor should be blacklisted by the Department of Commerce. An action that, if carried out, could frustrate all the work of the company in the most recent year and its hopes for the future.

[email protected]mx



Reference-www.eleconomista.com.mx

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.