Haiti in chaos as economy tanks and violence soars

SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:ASSOCIATED PRESSPort-au-Prince – 4 October 20221. Streets without vehicles, people2. Various of pedestrians climbing over tree branches in roadANNOTATION: Haiti is in a state of chaos and near complete paralysis not seen in decades: roads are blocked, fuel is scarce, and businesses have shut down.3. Closed bankASSOCIATED PRESSARCHIVE: Port-au-Prince – 22 October 20214. Armed gang membersANNOTATION: The country’s most powerful gang has blocked access to the largest fuel terminal and refuses to budge until the prime minister resigns.ASSOCIATED PRESSPort-au-Prince – 4 October 20225. Closed gas pump6. Various selling plastic containers with gasoline in the streetANNOTATION: Gas stations are closed, and people are walking for miles to get food and water because public transportation is extremely limited.ANNOTATION: Gallon of gasoline costs $30 on the black market in Port-au-Prince, but even that supply is drying up.7. Street food vendor Marie France working8. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Marie France, Street vendor:”We can’t sell anything; there’s no gas and we can’t sell to the motorcycle and taxi drivers because they can’t find gas to work, and they are my customers.”9. Various of people gathering to collect waterANNOTATION: At least eight people have died of cholera in recent days. 10. Bucket being filled with waterANNOTATION: Authorities worry about a fast-spreading scenario as they urged Haitians to have “a conscience” and allow fuel and water to flow into neighborhoods.11. Various of people walking with containersANNOTATION: Hundreds of people have been lining up to buy buckets of water since delivery trucks cannot circulate because of roadblocks and gang activity.ASSOCIATED PRESSARCHIVE: Port-au-Prince – 22 October 202112. Armed gang membersANNOTATION: Gangs have long wielded considerable power in Haiti, and their influence has only grown since the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse.STORYLINE: Daily life has spun out of control since Haitian Prime Minister Ariel Henry announced a rise in fuel prices last month, after which protests erupted across a country already in the grips of an economic crisis.Then Haiti’s most powerful gang took it a step further: blocking access to the country’s largest fuel terminal, announcing it would not budge until Henry resigns.Almost a month later, the standstill remains, and Haiti finds itself in a state of chaos and near complete paralysis not seen in decades: roads are blocked, fuel is scarce, and businesses have shut down in a situation the president of the neighboring Dominican Republic described as a “low-intensity civil war.”Protesters and gang leaders say they won’t back down until the prime minister steps down and fuel prices and other basic goods go down.Gas stations are closed, and people are walking for miles to get food and water because public transportation is extremely limited.A gallon of gasoline costs $30 on the black market in Port-au-Prince and more than $40 in rural areas, but even that supply is drying up as the country’s inflation rate hits 30%.The first round of protests in mid-September forced France and Spain to close their embassies and local banks to shut down as looters in the capital of Port-au-Prince and beyond attacked businesses, the homes of well-known politicians and even warehouses of various organizations and agencies, including the United Nations’ World Food Program, stealing millions of dollars’ worth of food and water.The lack of petroleum has fueled them further and recently forced hospitals to cut back staff and critical services and prompted businesses like water delivery companies to shut down, preventing the distribution of basic goods amid the start of a new cholera outbreak reported on Sunday.Banks and grocery stores also are operating on a limited schedule amid dwindling fuel supplies.TEVASA, the company that operates the fuel depot blocked by gangs, said it has about 10 million gallons of diesel and gasoline and more than 800,000 gallons of kerosene stored on site and has remained inoperant since September 12.Protests have since grown bigger, with tens of thousands of people taking to the streets in Haiti’s capital and beyond, including Gonaives and Cap-Haitien in the north, as they waive leafy green branches and chant, “Ariel has to go!”Gangs have always wielded considerable power in Haiti.Still, after the July 2021 assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, it has grown as they fight to control more territory, killings hundreds of Haitians, including women and children, in recent months and driving away some 20,000 people from their homes.Henry has pledged to hold elections as soon as it’s safe to do so, telling the United Nations General Assembly on September 24 that he has “no desire to stay in power longer than necessary.”Hundreds of people have been lining up to buy buckets of water since delivery trucks cannot go into neighbourhoods given the ongoing roadblocks, with people spending hours on what has become a daily routine for some.Authorities have said that at least eight people have died of cholera in recent days and worry about a fast-spreading scenario as they urged Haitians to have “a conscience” and allow fuel and water to flow into neighbourhoods.International leaders and current and former government officials have debated whether foreign intervention is needed, but the suggestion is repudiated by many who note that a group of U.N. peacekeepers in Haiti have sexually abused children and sparked a cholera epidemic more than a decade ago that killed nearly 10,000 people.But cholera is still not the main concern.The heavily armed gangs continue to control not only the gasoline but also big parts of the capital, where thousands of people had to flee their homes and thousands more are still trapped and without access to basic services.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: [email protected](ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.

reference: www.msn.com

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