Discover the daily life of the strong man Louis Cyr thanks to a virtual visit


It is now possible to virtually visit one of the houses inhabited by Louis Cyr during his life and discover the daily life of the man who was crowned the strongest man of all time at the end of the 19th century.

Born in Saint-Cyprien-de-Napierville in 1863, Louis Cyr married Mélina Comtois, originally from Saint-Jean-de-Matha, in Lanaudière, where they settled and lived together until 1912, the year of his death.

When, 100 years later, the organization Les Compagnons de Louis Cyr bought 215, rue Sainte-Louise, in the heart of the village, the couple’s former residence had been transformed into an ordinary-looking duplex. .

Discover the daily life of the strong man Louis Cyr thanks to a virtual visit

Photo QMI AGENCY, Geneviève Quessy

It took a lot of work to restore it to its original picturesque appearance. Now transformed into a museum, where we discover the daily life and the exploits of Louis Cyr, the place can be visited by going there from May to the end of November, but also online, thanks to a bilingual virtual visit, available at $5 cost.

“We worked from period photos, relying heavily on the Louis-Cyr archives of the University of Quebec in Montreal. Experts helped us, removed the layers of tapestry until we found the original walls. Thus, we are certain that we have found the appearance of the house as it was when Louis Cyr lived there,” says Benoit Gagné, general manager of Maison Louis-Cyr.

The visit allows you to discover fascinating aspects of the daily life of this larger-than-life character, whose many exploits have not been equaled to this day. In the kitchen of his house, where the table is filled with victuals evoking his gargantuan meals, we discover that the strong man could eat 32 hamburgers of a quarter of a pound each in a single meal!

Discover the daily life of the strong man Louis Cyr thanks to a virtual visit

Courtesy The Companions of Louis Cyr

Several artefacts exhibited in the various rooms of the house evoke an uncommon comfort at that time. “Through his performances in American circuses, he earned $2,000 a week. He thus became the first French-Canadian millionaire in 1898. He then founded his own circus, Cirque Cyr Barré, which is often said to be the ancestor of Cirque du Soleil,” says Benoit Gagné.

Photos of his exploits are displayed throughout the house. Such as horse shooting, a performance in which Louis Cyr, his arms tied, held back two horses that were pulling in opposite directions, a performance he performed 500 times. The man also hoisted at the end of a single arm a weight of 273 and a quarter pounds, a record that no one has equaled even today.

Discover the daily life of the strong man Louis Cyr thanks to a virtual visit

Photo QMI AGENCY, Geneviève Quessy

“Back then, strong men were revered. This is why, in 1889, the Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society thanked Louis Cyr for his contribution to the cause of French Canadians by presenting him with the Fortissimo belt, which he wore everywhere during his performances. In reality, he was quite a character, a showman and a good musician. It’s important to bring his memory and this aspect of our history to life,” says Benoit Gagné.

Discover the daily life of the strong man Louis Cyr thanks to a virtual visit

Photo QMI AGENCY, Geneviève Quessy




Reference-www.journaldemontreal.com

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