Crisis in Haiti | Canada will help citizens leave Haiti

(Ottawa) After the United States and France, it is Canada’s turn to launch an “assisted departure” operation for its nationals in Haiti.


The operation begins today, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mélanie Joly, announced on Monday.

Until recently, the Government of Canada had ruled out the idea of ​​evacuating its nationals, while ensuring that contingency plans had been developed in the event of a deterioration in the security situation in Haiti.

A little over a week ago, the Canadian government had to resolve to redeploy part of its staff from the embassy in Port-au-Prince. These employees were transported to the Dominican Republic on chartered helicopters.

For almost two years now, Canada has recommended avoiding all travel to Haiti “due to the threat posed by kidnappings, gang-related violence and possible civil unrest throughout the country.”

For those already on Haitian territory, Ottawa recommends “sheltering in place, stocking up on basic necessities (food, water and medicine)” and “limiting their movements”.

According to Global Affairs Canada (GAC) records, 3,039 Canadians are currently in Haiti. Since March 3, 245 requests for information, including “on departure options,” have been sent, the ministry noted in a press release last Friday.

Paris and Washington

PHOTO RICHARD PIERRIN, AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

For almost two years now, Canada has recommended avoiding all travel to Haiti “due to the threat posed by kidnappings, gang-related violence and possible civil unrest throughout the country.”

France and the United States have evacuated some of their nationals in recent days, while the international airport of Port-au-Prince has been closed for some three months and the capital is in the grip of yet another surge of violence in the wake of the resignation of Prime Minister Ariel Henry.

French nationals who wanted to leave with the help of the French government were able to join a national navy vessel which was then to transport them to Fort-de-France, in Martinique, Agence France-Presse reported on Monday.

France had chartered military helicopters to extricate them from the Haitian capital. Some 1,100 French people, including a large number of dual nationals, live on the Caribbean island, according to figures provided by the Quai d’Orsay.

The United States, for its part, has evacuated more than 200 nationals so far.

Transition: already some hiccups

PHOTO RICARDO HERNANDEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

France and the United States have evacuated some of their nationals in recent days, while the international airport of Port-au-Prince has been closed for some three months and the capital is in the grip of yet another surge of violence in the wake of the resignation of Prime Minister Ariel Henry.

The governance transition period promises to be perilous in Haiti.

We knew it, but we had a first demonstration of it over the weekend, when the creation of the presidential transitional council came up against disagreements between the personalities who should compose it.

Diplomats and observers agree that “it is not realistic to think about elections before 18 months,” Canadian Ambassador to Haiti, André François Giroux, recently said in an interview.

with Agence France-Presse


reference: www.lapresse.ca

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