A Crescent street more popular than ever


The young employees busy at the launch of the F1 festivities on Crescent Street had not yet finished setting up certain kiosks that there were already crowds everywhere. Two years of pandemic, it excites!

Until Saturday evening, the street is closed between de Maisonneuve and Sainte-Catherine for these traditional three days of celebrating the big racing cars.

“For the first time, rue de Maisonneuve at the intersection is closed to erect stages and present shows,” explains Glenn Castanheira, president of the SDC Centre-Ville.

I came across Mr. Castanheira by chance. He walked around smiling blissfully.

“It’s Thursday, the weather isn’t good, and it’s crowded! he rejoices.

He spoke thus, of course, before the storm broke around 4 p.m. and sent a cold shower over the event!

On Crescent, we are far from the expensive society life of the Ritz or the Auberge Saint-Gabriel.

No Saudi princes or richly dressed visitors: this downtown street is definitely a popular festival, I noticed.

There are many children. The people we met came mainly from the rest of Canada.


The spokesperson for the event, the strong man Hugo Girard, was engaged in a competition to change tires.

Photo Louis-Philippe Messier

The spokesperson for the event, the strong man Hugo Girard, was engaged in a competition to change tires.

“I agreed to be the spokesperson because all the shows are free and it’s an opportunity to be close to people,” said the strong man Hugo Girard.

Cars without girls

There are beautiful cars to admire, some where you can sit and strike a pose.

A dozen driving simulation stations and different games of skill related to F1, including one where you pretend to change the oil.

I couldn’t find a luxury car dummy.

In fact, I saw one: the only specimen of this endangered species.

Apparently, the organizers have taken it easy on the use of sexy ladies around the cars.

An affable man in his wheelchair greets me:

“I come from Hearst, Ontario and have been coming since 1985,” says Roger Lecours.


For the Grand Prix, Johanne Jolin and Roger Lecours descended from Hearst in northern Ontario.

Photo Louis-Philippe Messier

For the Grand Prix, Johanne Jolin and Roger Lecours descended from Hearst in northern Ontario.

With his wife Johanne Jolin, Mr. Lecours strolls between the kiosks and strikes up conversations with other festival-goers.

“We caught the rain, but the atmosphere is good! exclaims M.me Jolin.

“I pray for good weather on Sunday,” Miguel Martines confides to me, his shoulders covered with a flag from Mexico, his country of origin.

“I’ve never seen so many people here so early,” says Isabelle Molnar, a regular at the Grand Prix, who came from Toronto with her husband Joe.

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Reference-www.journaldemontreal.com

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