Friday, December 3

Indigenous leaders can improve their business skills through the new HEC Montréal school

The first cohort of 12-15 students will include First Nations chiefs and chiefs of communities.

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In an attempt to foster better management and business practices in Quebec’s indigenous communities, the HEC Montréal business school has launched an educational project designed for current and future First Nations leaders.

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The new school, called First Nations Executive Education, was designed by indigenous community leaders in conjunction with the University of Montreal business school.

The program will offer college-level short courses for elected officials, administrators, managers, and entrepreneurs in First Nations communities.

The school is the brainchild of Manon Jeannotte and Ken Rock, both graduates of the McGill-HEC Montréal Executive MBA program.

“Our vision is to provide each leader with the tools they need to be a force for positive change and success within their communities, elements that are critical to First Nations self-determination and improved socioeconomic conditions,” said Rock at a press conference. in Montreal on Thursday.

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The first cohort of 12-15 students will include First Nations chiefs and chiefs of communities.

The free classes, which begin next month, will be held online, in local communities and at the HEC.

One of the goals is to enhance the business acumen of community leaders and enable indigenous peoples to play a greater role in the economic development of their community.

“The Cree have experience with Hydro-Québec, the Atikamekw have a lot of forestry experience, and the Innu have experience with the mining industry,” Rock said. “The people who participate will share their experience with other communities.”

HEC teachers and First Nations trainers will lead the classes. The modules offered will be tailored to the needs of the participants.

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HEC is committed to educating business and community leaders throughout Quebec, said Serge Lafrance, director of HEC Montréal’s executive education program.

The new project “is unique because it was started by and for the First Nations community,” he said.

The announcement came on the first day of the Quebec and Indigenous Peoples’ Great Economic Circle, a two-day event in which First Nations, Quebec business representatives and elected leaders discuss ways to improve the economies of the communities of the First Nations.

Ghislain Picard, head of the Quebec-Labrador Assembly of First Nations, said he was so impressed with the new project that he signed up to be one of the educators.

“It addresses the need to improve leadership skills that will have a positive impact on all of our communities,” he said.

“For too long, we have been on the sidelines of economic development. This will improve the participation of indigenous peoples in the local economy ”.

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Reference-montrealgazette.com

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